Date and Time: Wednesday 4th December 2013 ~~~ 11:45 – 13:15
Location: To be updated
Theme: Environment and Natural Resources

Background material :

Discussion Paper: Agricultural Trade and Food Security, Choosing Between Trade and Non-Trade Policy Instruments

Food Security in Africa - http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i0714e/i0714e.pdf

G33 Proposal: ICTSD-FAO Information Note - http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/est/PUBLICATIONS/g33-proposal-early-agreement-on-elements-of-the-draft-doha-accord-to-address-food-security_1_.pdf

Articulating and Mainstreaming Agricultural Trade Policy and Support Measures - http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/est/PUBLICATIONS/International_trade_PB/FullBookLowResNoCrop.pdf

FAO publications on trade and food security:  http://www.fao.org/economic/est/international-trade/foodsecurity/en/

FAO trade related publications: http://www.fao.org/economic/est/publications/en/

Organiser

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Session Objectives

• To illustrate divergent views on the use of trade and market policy in the achievement of food security objectives.
• To provide examples of the implications of the use of trade and market policy for different stakeholder groups in different contexts.
• To provide an opportunity to explore how trade agreements can be formulated to ensure appropriate flexibilities and constraints to the use of trade and market policy in achieving food security objectives.

Synopsis

The session will comprise a series of panel interventions followed by structured discussion which will address several key questions. Following a brief introduction by the Moderator who will introduce key issues on the linkages between trade and market policy and food security, two speakers will be asked to illustrate divergent views on the use of trade and market policy in achievement of food security objectives. These speakers will be asked to address the issue by focusing on particular examples: (i) Eastern and Southern African grains markets (where ad hoc policy interventions are the norm) and (ii) an Asian public procurement system (where a more systematic/rules based approach to intervention is followed). These speakers will be followed by an intervention to address questions such as: “When should/can trade and market policy interventions be used in support of increased food security?”; “What lessons have been learnt with regards to trade and market policy interventions in staple food markets?” A final panel intervention will address the implications of these lessons for multilateral and regional trade negotiations - “To what extent can required flexibilities be incorporated in trade agreements?” Following the panel interventions, structured discussion with the audience will seek to identify key areas of agreement and disagreement on the potential role of trade and market policy in support of improved food security and the implications for trade negotiations.